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#rfintnt

Look out your window. You might not have this view, but think about your place on the planet. Right now, this beautiful process is happening probably thousands of miles away from you. You are more connected to these turtles than you may think. Think they are amazing? Want to save them? Start by NOT littering (including cigarette butts) saying NO to plastic drinking straws, NO to plastic bags, and purchase only fish caught by pole not by a gill net. Choose one thing to protect these living dinosaurs, Leatherback sea turtles and all turtles.
#rfintnt
#greenedventures
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Enjoying the beach at Grande Riviere. ... See MoreSee Less

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We rescued some baby sea turtles!!
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Jan E. Smith, Brittany Papa and 17 others like this

John MorleyWere they going the wrong way? Or stranded? Leatherbacks are amazing!7 days ago

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Trinidad & Tobago Update
By Tara

Last night we found out that Tropical Depression Bernie was going to modify some of our planned itinerary in Trinidad. Thankfully, our flight from Tobago to Trinidad was very early and our departing flights were not affected by the incoming weather. We are currently experiencing Tropical Storm Bret. It is expected to continue until the early morning. We are safe, high, dry, and with all services. For us, it's like a strong rainstorm right now.

Instead of going to see turtles today, we switched gears and did repelling off of Avocat Waterfall on the North Ridge of Trinidad in a montane (mountainous) rainforest. The journey through the rainforest to the waterfall was a trail that meandered in and out of a shallow river and through lush jungle. At times the rain poured down cold and hard, others it was a soft mist. Avocat is a 72ft waterfall with a large clear pool at the bottom. The students took turns repelling over the falls -- after a short lesson, of course. I have photos of everyone, but the internet signal is weak and I can't upload them all right now.
During the walk back, we picked up a couple of bags of garbage in the river. It's sad to see the water littered with KFC containers, chip wrappers, plastic water bottles, and Styrofoam plates and cups. I am proud of the students for taking action, and wanting to help.
We returned to Pax guest house. Dinner was fun and we enjoyed a free night.
#rfintnt

Update: as of 5am June 20 we are no longer in a tropical storm.
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Mary Pat Finnegan, Melanie Bragg and 13 others like this

Tina WilsonSo awesome Tara. I luv the smiles on every bodies face.7 days ago   ·  1

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Trinidad Update
By Tessa

Common name: White Tail Saberwing

Scientific name: Camplylopterus ensipenn

This little hummingbird lives in the rainforests of Tobago. Up until the 1960s it was a fairly common hummingbird all throughout Venezuela, Trinidad and Tobago. There w as a devastating hurricane that hit this birds native area. After that storm the bird was thought to be extinct. 30 years went by until the bird was spotted again. Currently, the bird thought it only survive ok Tobago. These birds have a diet of nectar from undergrowth flowers and commonly make cup sized nests to raise theiryoung in.
Photo credit wiki commons
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Trinidad Update
By Nicole

Whitespotted filefish

The whitespotted filefish can change color very rapidly, I saw this when I swam too close to them.They're pretty friendly and let you get pretty close to them. They are generally found in pairs. They are omnivores- they eat animals like sponges and stinging corals but they also eat algae.

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Trinidad Update
By Olivia
Photo by Tessa

Trinidad motmot:
The Trinidad motmot is only found in Trinidad and Tobago and is a representative of the blue crown motmots. The binomial name is Momotus Bahamensis. They eat small insects and lizards but also eat fruit. The call they make almost sounds like an owl. They have a black center crown on the top of their head and a black eye mask but the rest of the body is a bright green, orange chest and blue tail feathers. At the end of the tail there are racquet tips and when they get disturbed they swing those back and fourth really fast. The Trinidad motmot nests at the end of long tunnels in the ground where they will lay their eggs. There is. It a lot of history on this bird or details about its diet.
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Trinidad Update June 28, 2017
Sara & Abby

This morning we woke up at around 7:30 and ate breakfast at 8. After a good breakfast of a lot of sausage and bacon, we packed up for our journey ahead of us. During the lengthy drive we were taught about some of the history of Tobago. The most memorable thing we learned about was definitely el Draque the sea man who would tie you to the bow of his ship and drag you across barnacles beneath. People told this story to keep children from wandering away. After the drive we arrived at the Gilpin Hike where we hiked through the rainforest. We took a minute when we first started to have a moment of silence to appreciate and feel the senses of the forest. Throughout the hike we saw a variety of birds, including the rare White-Tailed Saber Wing Hummingbird, which is only found on Tobago. We then split up into groups to make observations about the different layers of the rainforest. Once we completed our hike we headed to Castara where we ate lunch and snorkeled. The highlight of the snorkel trip was seeing a giant sting ray right beneath us. Our snorkeling has definitely improved as we were all free diving and observing many fish we had learned about or want to learn about. On the way up there were results of a spear fishing contest from earlier that day. They were weighing fish to see the winner and there was a lion fish that weighed 2.25 pounds. After Castara we headed to D Pink for some refreshing ice cream and limed for a little bit. Then back on the bus to the Grafton Hotel. To finish the night we ate a filling dinner and had a discussion involving the activity we did in the rainforest.
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Olivia Hunn, Susan Riesau and 14 others like this

Sharon HunnMy daughter Olivia is with you on your trip! Amazing photos! Thank You, Sharon Hunn1 week ago   ·  1
Rachel Lavallee BelangerDefinitely an experience of a lifetime. Nicole is very lucky to be able to go on this trip.1 week ago   ·  1

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Trinidad & Tobago Update
June 18, 2017.
A stop at the great Kapok Tree.
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Some beautiful underwater photos by Courtenay Bushman Rooks in Tobago. The water clarity has been great and the students are awesome at snorkeling.
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Snorkeling at Grafton this morning. ... See MoreSee Less

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A little lesson at breakfast before we head out to snorkel. ... See MoreSee Less

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Trinidad Update
June 16, 2017
By Erin

West Indian Sea Egg

We got to hold one today. It felt so weird when its little tube feet sucked onto my hands. The West Indian Sea Egg is a type of sea urchin. It eats algae through an arrangement of five teeth called Aristotles Lantern on its underside. It has little tube feet that collect debris to shield itself from the sun. Due to overfishing the population of this adorable creature is declining.
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